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Building Systems and Efficiency Courses

Adjustable Speed Drives

Advanced Unitary Air Conditioning

Air Handling Systems Efficiency – HYBRID Instruction

Chilled Water Systems

Commercial Refrigeration

Compressed Air System Efficiency

Cooling Towers

Distributed Energy Resources

Energy Efficient Lighting Systems

Energy Management Systems (EMS)

HVAC System Testing for Energy Efficiency

Implementing Energy Efficiency Measures in Commercial and Industrial Applications

Industrial Refrigeration and Refrigerated Warehouses

Introduction to Unitary Air Conditioning

Motor Efficiency

Adjustable Speed Drives

Number of Credits: 6.0 NATE

Instructor: David Wylie

Course Description: Adjustable speed drives (ASDs) are found in commercial, process, and industrial facilities. ASDs are used to modulate the speed of operations, which can save on energy costs. This class will cover system fundamentals including load types, flow control for pumps and fans, and adjusting motor speed with ASDs. All techniques discussed will be practical and proven approaches. Energy efficiency strategies like air conditioning for commercial application problems such as power quality issues will also be analyzed. Get smart about using ASDs with intelligent control to apply savings strategies.

Audience: This class is intended for engineers, technicians, operators, and maintenance professionals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the types of adjustable speed loads ad drives including variable frequency drives (VFDs)
  • Discuss what type of control is best for different ASD applications and instances where ASDs can help save energy
  • Compare the economic benefits and tradeoffs of using ASDs
  • Analyze methods to overcome ASD power quality and motor insulation issues

Course offered by:

Idaho Power

LADWP

SDGE

Advanced Unitary Air Conditioning

(Follows Introduction to Unitary Air Conditioning)

Number of Credits: NATE 6.0, BPI 6.0

Course Description: Professionals receive in depth knowledge on unitary air conditioning systems. With this course, attendees will learn about the different components that are part of these systems, as well as ventilation strategies, energy efficiency strategies, and how to better extend the life of a unitary air conditioning unit. The major topics that this course will cover includes the air condition cycle, different components of unitary air conditioning and their role, how to read name plates and manufacturer specification sheets, the common issues faced with this technology and more.

Audience: This class is intended for technicians, engineers, operators, and maintenance professionals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze and understand system components
  • Review energy efficiency strategies for particular systems
  • Examine how to properly identify HVAC equipment and interpret specifications
  • Identify frequently experienced issues with this technology and discuss how to remedy them

Air Handling Systems Efficiency – HYBRID Instruction 

Number of Credits: 6.0 NATE, BPI 6.0 

Course Description: HVAC professionals will be given a foundation and overview of air conditioning systems, integrated demand side management, and related Title 24 measures. Attendees will learn how to minimize the cost of large, commercial central air conditioning systems while keeping the facility comfortable. Major topics include variable and constant air-volume systems, adjustable speed-drives, ventilation, economy cycle, and other efficiency opportunities. Examples will be presented that demonstrate a model for analyzing typical, variable air-volume retrofit economics. This course includes (2) instructor-led sessions, plus access to online/on-demand resources. 

Audience: This class is intended for technicians, engineers, facility maintenance personnel, and HVAC professionals. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Identify the components of a central plant system and explain how the chiller, cooling tower, boiler, air handling system, and pumps function to remove heat loads
  • Assess the differences in control and efficiency for variable and constant air volume systems and how to optimize performance of each
  • Define the concept of Integrated Demand Side Management (IDSM) and describe demand-side management strategies that can be used for air handling systems
  • Review relevant Title 24 Part 6 code triggers, mandatory measures, and system checklists that can help save energy and reduce costs

Chilled Water Systems

Number of Credits: 6.0 NATE, BPI 6.0

Course Description: Chilled water systems are used to provide air conditioning for commercial buildings and to support industrial processes. This class presents an overview of chiller systems including basic components and operations, sizing air-conditioning loads, air-conditioning system concepts, common system configurations, measuring and improving chiller efficiency, and AC cost and efficiency considerations. It also examines other system components such as compressors, condensers, evaporators, cooling towers, and water treatment options.

Audience: This class is intended for engineers, technicians, facility managers, and maintenance personnel.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the components of a central plant system and explain how the chiller, cooling tower, boiler, air handling system, and pumps function to remove heat loads
  • Assess the differences in control and efficiency for variable and constant air volume systems and how to optimize performance of each
  • Define the concept of Integrated Demand Side Management (IDSM) and describe demand-side management strategies that can be used for air handling systems
  • Review relevant Title 24 Part 6 code triggers, mandatory measures, and system checklists that can help save energy and reduce costs

Commercial Refrigeration

Number of Credits: 6.0 NATE, BPI 6.0

Course Description: There is a wide variety of commercial refrigeration equipment, from ice machines to supermarket food displays. Today, there are many opportunities for improving the efficiency of existing equipment or for implementing new ones. This course reviews elementary refrigeration concepts and introduces various energy efficiency techniques that can save on energy costs. It addresses the latest refrigerant issues, efficiency measures, equipment options, Title 24 compliance, integrated demand side management (IDSM), and the benefits presented by these topics.

Audience: This class is intended for engineers, technicians, and HVACR technicians.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the components of a commercial refrigeration system
  • Assess ways to improve the energy efficiency of refrigeration systems
  • Define the concept of IDSM and describe demand-side management strategies that can be used for commercial refrigeration
  • Review relevant Title 24 Part 6 code triggers and mandatory measures

Compressed Air System Efficiency

Number of Credits: NATE 6.0

Course Description: Plant and production managers, engineers, and maintenance professionals will learn about the types of compressed air systems, components, typical applications and operations, maintenance procedures, multiple compressor system strategies, and energy-saving opportunities and practices. The class will also provide an overview of integrated demand side management (IDSM) strategies and as part of an exercise, participants will identify and describe how to improve overall system efficiency and possibly avoid the need to purchase new equipment.

Audience: This class is intended for plant and production managers, engineers, maintenance professionals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify components of a basic compressed air system and describe the function of each
  • Interpret key measurements of system efficiency, such as pressure, watts, and cubic feet per minute (cfm)
  • Demonstrate how speed, storage, and multiple compressor configurations can be used to achieve desired level of flow control and trim control
  • Define the concept of IDSM and describe demand-side management strategies that can be used for compressed air systems

Cooling Towers

Number of Credits: 6.0 NATE, BPI 6.0

Course Description: Cooling towers play an important role in providing air conditioning for commercial buildings and industrial facilities. They support industrial processes and are used to remove heat from the condenser water. The purpose of this course is to describe typical systems that use cooling towers, key elements of cooling tower design, efficiency features, efficient operation, and maintenance issues.

Audience: This class is intended for engineers, technicians, and maintenance personnel.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the basics of cooling towers and their efficient operation
  • Analyze the impact to operational efficiency when the condenser water temperature is adjusted
  • Identify the trade-off between cooling tower size and energy savings
  • Review common maintenance issues and their corresponding solutions

Distributed Energy Resources

Number of Credits: BPI 3.0

Course Description: Distributed energy resources (DER), refers to the production of electricity by entities other than the utility company. Distributed Generation (DG) refers to distributed generation produced on the customer side of the utility meter. This course will present an overview of both DER and DG, encompassing the attributes of these technologies. It will explore distribution vs. transmission, cogeneration, and power generation prime movers including reciprocating engine generation, turbines, and micro turbines. Additionally, this course will cover power quality and quantity, different types of fuel cell, photovoltaic (PV) cells, and common configurations including grid-connected systems, utility interconnection policy, and more.

Audience: This class is intended for utility personnel, policymakers, and engineers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the intricacies of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and Distributed Generation (DG) technologies
  • Review distribution vs. transmission, cogeneration, and power generation prime movers
  • Discuss photovoltaic cells, including where they are used, how they work, and common configurations
  • Recognizing benefits of DER and DG technologies on the grid

Energy Efficient Lighting Systems

Number of Credits: BPI 3.0

Course Description: In many older facilities, existing lighting systems were not designed with energy conservation in mind and do not meet the lighting requirements of the tasks being performed at the facility. This course begins with lighting concepts and relevant terms. Then discusses how to improve lighting efficiency with maintenance, lighting levels, de-lamping, daylighting, and other control strategies. It also presents an overview of new lighting technology and types of lamps, including four generations of T-8 fluorescent lamps, T-5 lamps, induction, high intensity discharge lamps, LEDs and more.

Audience: This class is intended for homeowners, business owners, technicians, facility managers, and engineers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Distinguish the different types of lighting fixtures and their components
  • Review lighting maintenance procedures and methods for load reduction
  • Analyze how to use lamp performance criteria to compare products offered by different manufacturers
  • Evaluate the type and amount of lighting necessary for different circumstances and opportunities for manual or automatic control

Energy Management Systems (EMS)

Number of Credits: BPI 3.0

Course Description: This course will help learn about the potential operating cost-savings using energy management systems and provide insight on how to maximize savings using the most current technology in HVAC control methods. Attendees will explore communication networks, equipment studies, conceptual system design, integrated demand side management, Title 24 regulations, and cost/benefit analysis to help identify, design, and plan for your energy management system.

Audience: This class is intended for building managers, as well as operations and maintenance professionals with a basic understanding of HVAC systems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the three levels of facility controls, ways to control a local loop, and system control strategies for energy conservation
  • Review EMS functions, controls, and techniques for air systems, package units, central refrigeration equipment, hot water boiler plants, and lighting systems equipment
  • Define the concept of integrated demand side management (IDSM) and describe demand-side management strategies that can be used for energy management systems
  • Identify relevant Title 24 Part 6 code triggers and mandatory measures

HVAC System Testing for Energy Efficiency

Number of Credits: NATE 6.0, BPI 6.0

Course Description: This class presents the relevant issues and available methods for field testing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, and explores and explains the use of specific testing and data acquisition instruments. It will analyze the components of a central plant system, the characteristics and operation of control devices, such as valves, dampers, and actuators, and explain how to establish a plan for testing including determining testing criteria, acquiring operating data, and building a usage trend.

Audience: This class is intended for engineers, facility maintenance personnel, and HVAC technicians.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine how to test air conditioning systems for efficiency and excessive wear and determine if there are economically viable ways to implement Integrated Demand Side Management (IDSM)
  • Name and describe the key factors that affect system efficiency
  • Review implementations of data collection strategies and understand how they are used in sample calculations
  • Walkthrough a system testing checklist to evaluate equipment and operations in your own building

Implementing Energy Efficiency Measures in Commercial and Industrial Applications

Number of Credits: NATE 6.0, BPI 6.0

Course Description: This course presents a comprehensive overview of many topics related to the energy efficiency of most commercial facilities. Topics include energy efficiency, lighting, motors, air conditioning systems, boilers, refrigeration, energy audits, and work plans. Energy managers and maintenance professionals – come learn how to do a basic audit of your facility to determine if new equipment is worth the investment.

Audience: This class is intended for facility managers, maintenance professionals, and energy managers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand and articulate the many energy efficiency measures used in commercial facilities
  • Identify basic electrical and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems
  • Review how to perform energy assessments, screening audits, and feasibility studies
  • Analyze how to select the proper equipment for a specific commercial and industrial facility

Industrial Refrigeration and Refrigerated Warehouses

Number of Credits: NATE 6.0

Course Description: This course reviews basic industrial refrigeration concepts and provides a system overview, including typical industrial refrigeration practices, applications, equipment, and configurations. Attendees will learn how to achieve energy savings by improving the operating efficiency of industrial refrigeration systems, meeting Title 24 standards, and implementing integrated demand side management strategies. In-class exercises explore the economics of different industrial refrigeration system configurations.

Audience: This class is intended for facility maintenance, building operations managers, technicians, and engineers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe energy efficiency measures for industrial refrigeration systems
  • Examine how new opportunities in permanent load shifting, with thermal energy storage, can provide energy savings
  • Analyze the efficiency of evaporators and condensers and then describe their importance when it comes to product selection
  • Explain how variable speed drives are used with evaporators

Introduction to Unitary Air Conditioning

Number of Credits: 6.0 NATE, BPI 6.0

Course Description: Professionals will be given a high-level overview of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) as well as an introduction to unitary air conditioning systems. Attendees will gain a basic understanding of the different types of unitary air conditioning systems, their applications, and how they operate. This class is meant to give a basic understanding of the unitary AC system and its role in a building. Major topics of this course include defining HVAC with the different types of heat transfer, standards addressing factors that affect human comfort, various forms of heats gains and losses and the overall air conditioning cycle. It will also cover the applications of Unitary AC cooling and heating, refrigerant types, air and heat movement, temperature controls and ratings.

Audience: This class is intended for HVAC technicians, facility maintenance personnel, and engineers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the technology and role of a Unitary AC system
  • Understand the science of human comfort and heat transfer as they relate to HVAC sizing and efficiency
  • Identify and review the types of heat gains and losses in a building
  • Review the types of AC systems, their components/refrigerants, and their corresponding applications

Motor Efficiency

Number of Credits: NATE 6.0

Course Description: Learn about premium motor efficiency and how it can reduce energy costs for commercial and industrial facilities. Course content covers operating loads, load matching, motor losses, efficiency testing, rating standards, the principles of an efficient motor, better management of motors for maximum operation, motor life expectancy, and how to benefit from motor efficiency in facilities. This class also explores different types of motors, various efficiency features, and how to repair or replace motors.

Audience: This class is intended for maintenance professionals, technicians, facility managers, and engineers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Compare motor size with operating load and explore the correlation between them
  • Assess load control opportunities for motors and identify causes for motor failure
  • Discuss motor losses and how to increase their energy efficiency
  • Evaluate whether to rewind, repair, or replace a problematic motor